We Cannot Forget the People of Sous in Southern Morocco

We Cannot Forget the People of Sous in Southern Morocco

We Cannot Forget the People of Sous in Southern Morocco

By / Agriculture / Friday, 20 July 2018 01:11

Four out of ten people in Morocco are employed in the agricultural sector. Thousands of these people are in the southern region of Sous. For centuries, this region has gifted Morocco its most fertile land. Many of the Moroccans who live here are Berber-speaking peoples of the Imesmoden and Iẓnagen Berber Tribal Confederacies. Main inhabitants are however, drawn from the Susian community who speak the Tasusit Berber language. This information is important because most non-Moroccans do not appreciate the rich linguistic and cultural identity of the Berbers.

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If you take a walk in the bustling Sous marketplace, you will find evidence of this agricultural vibrance. You will come across crates of jolly tomatoes and other agricultural produce waiting to be purchased by the hundreds who throng the market.

Almost thirty thousand people in Sous earn their living from agriculture. They are able to pay rent and educate their children through agriculture. Many work in the agricultural plants that produce 90 percent of Morocco’s exports, making Sous the country’s agricultural export superpower.

Unfortunately, not even this agricultural superpower is immune to the searing effects of climate change. In recent years, drought and floods have assaulted Sous and left it battered. The livelihoods of those thirty-thousand people whose very lives and livelihoods are fueled by agriculture are now in jeopardy.

It is now conceivable that fewer and fewer of them will be packing vegetables and fruits into containers bound for Europe because there will be correspondingly fewer vegetables and fruits from their once consistently lush farms.

This is the reality of climate change. So much has been written and said about this reality that millions of people are now numb to the gravity of it all. But for that young mother-of-three from Sous whose three children depend on her job at the fruit factory, climate change is now an everyday reality. She cannot be forgotten by the global community because if that happens, those children will be swept away by the flood of uncertainties that is now sweeping across Sous, Morocco’s agricultural superpower.

Author

DJ Bwakali

DJ Bwakali

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